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Ohio Clock Blog Offers News and Insights from the Hill

Federal Policy team's experience in House and Senate benefits readers and clients

News / May 30, 2018

The Federal Policy team launched the firm’s newest blog, the Ohio Clock, earlier this month. Named for the iconic, two-century-old clock just outside the main entrance of the U.S. Senate, the blog provides updates and analysis on issues and legislation from Capitol Hill.

In addition to sharing insights from blog Editor Chris Jones – who worked for nearly 15 years in the House and Senate as a senior congressional aide – the blog will feature articles from Mike Ferguson, leader of the Federal Policy team, and Senior Advisor Adam Higgins.

Ferguson served for nearly a decade in Congress representing a district in New Jersey, and he held leadership roles on key policy initiatives. Higgins began his career on Capitol Hill and for 10 years has been advocating for clients in multiple sectors, including life sciences, energy and financial services.

“The ‘Ohio Clock’ is an insiderish reference – everyone who’s ever worked on the Hill knows the Ohio Clock,” Jones said. “We knew it was the perfect name for our blog because BakerHostetler was founded in Ohio, and because we want to give readers insider context and analysis that they might not find elsewhere online. We’re not a news service, but our goal is to provide clients and friends of the firm with the perspective to better understand government action and how it might impact their business decisions.”

Some of the first blog articles address the status of recent tax cuts beyond their 2025 expiration date; Congress’ progress – or lack thereof – on spending bills; and passage of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act, which is a sweeping rewrite of the nation’s banking rules that would roll back key elements of Dodd-Frank.

Since 1817, the 11-foot tall Ohio Clock has kept time and been a witness to history. Commissioned by Senator David Daggett, it’s often seen in the background when Senate leaders hold news conferences in the corridor just off the Senate floor. How the Ohio Clock got its name is a mystery. Sen. Daggett was from Connecticut, not Ohio, and the clockmaker who built it, Thomas Voigt, was from Philadelphia. The shield on the clock’s case has 17 stars, and some speculated that the clock was meant to commemorate Ohio’s admission to the Union as the 17th state. But Senate historians say there’s no evidence of that, and Sen. Daggett’s 1815 letter commissioning the clock makes no mention of Ohio.

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